TargetWoman Condensed Health Information



LH

Luteinizing Hormone LH is another important hormone for reproduction. In men, LH promotes secretion of testosterone. In women, LH surge in the second part of the menstrual cycle triggers ovulation. LH is released when a woman is ovulating, and causes the ovaries to release an egg. LH and FSH are closely linked. At the beginning of the menstrual cycle, FSH and LH are secreted to stimulate ovarian follicles. Mid-cycle, the growing follicle will inhibit FSH secretion and increase estrogen. This is a trigger for sudden release of LH that leads to release of the mature egg.


The LH Surge is vital for pregnancy - as it causes the matured egg to be released. The next 24 - 36 hours are the fertile window when a woman can get pregnant. Ovulation Predictor Kits that are available measure LH level in the urine - identifying the best time to conceive. Reduced levels of LH in females indicate ovarian hyperfunction.

LH and PCOS

In females suffering from PCOS - Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, the LH levels are already elevated when compared to FSH. Since there is no LH surge, ovulation does not take place. Elevated LH levels cause release of androgens from the ovaries leading to acne and Hirsutism. Infertility and miscarriage are common. Studies have shown that there is a direct relation between insulin resistance and elevated LH levels.


LH levels

In females, the LH levels in the blood can vary based on stage of menstrual cycle, age, pregnancy and other pituitary gland disorders. It can be measured by a blood test or urine test. Usually this test is prescribed for women with irregular periods trying to get pregnant or assessing if a woman has entered menopause. Men with low testosterone levels or having very late puberty are asked to take the LH test.

High levels of Luteinizing hormone are most often caused by ovarian tumors or improperly-developed ovaries. Thyroid or Adrenal disease can elevate LH levels. PCOS and Autoimmune disorders also cause the levels of Luteinizing hormone to rise. Low levels of Luteinizing hormone indicate ovarian failure or primary testicular failure. This can happen due to viral infections such as mumps, autoimmune disorders, radiation exposure and tumors.


Women:

Early phase of menstrual cycle: 0.5 to 16.9 IU/L

Peak of menstrual cycle: 8.7 to 76.3 IU/L

Using contraceptives: 0.7 to 5.6 IU/L

Pregnant: less than 1.5 IU/L

Menopause: 15.9 to 54.0 IU/L

Men:

Between 20 years and 70 years: 0.7 to 7.9 IU/L

Over 70 years: 3.1 to 34.0 IU/L


Contraceptive pill

Birth control pills are oral contraceptives that inhibit the body's fertility level through chemical means. The oral contraceptive contains synthetic hormones that alter the woman's hormonal system so that ovulation is prevented. The birth control pill has been around since the 1960s and is popularly used even today. The modern combination pills are popular on account of the fewer side effects and high success rate. But the birth control pill does not offer any protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or HIV and AIDS.


Estrogen and progesterone are the key hormones that keep a woman's menstrual cycle going. The contraceptive pill contains both these hormones, which go into making a hostile environment for an embryo to develop. Modern pills contain less estrogen than their earlier versions. The birth control pill works as a contraceptive by blocking the release of an egg. While a woman is on birth control pill, the brain no longer signals the ovaries to produce an egg each month. In this way, the contraceptive pill seeks to block ovulation so as to prevent a pregnancy. The cervical mucous becomes thick and unreceptive to sperm thereby making its progress through the fallopian tubes difficult. The endometrium also becomes unreceptive to receive the fertilized egg.


The combined birth control pills contain both the hormones estrogen and progesterone. Combination pills prevent the ovaries from releasing eggs. The progesterone-only contraception pills thicken the cervical mucus making it difficult for the sperm to travel. Combination pills are more effective than progesterone only pills. The success rate of birth control pills is about 97 - 99%, if taken correctly. The pill is an easily reversible method of contraception. If the woman is also taking antibiotics such as rifampin or anti-seizure medications, the birth control pill may not be as effective. Some anti-HIV protease inhibitors and anti-fungal oral medication may also affect the efficacy of oral contraceptives.


Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

In PCOS, under-developed follicles accumulate in the ovaries. Since they fail to mature, they accumulate as cysts in the ovaries. The low levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and elevated levels of androgens may be the reasons for this condition. When there is no ovulation, the progesterone hormone is not created and the lining of the uterus is not shed in a timely fashion. This increases the chances of endometrial hyperplasia and even cancer.


Another feature associated with PCOS is hyper androgenism or increased responsiveness to testosterone. This usually shows up in oily skin and acne. Excess hair may be noticed on the face and other parts of the body. Women suffering from PCOS have a weight problem, especially around the waist. Insulin resistance is also noticed in some women. This increases the risk of developing diabetes in later years.


Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Symptom


  • Absence of menses or abnormal or scanty menstrual periods
  • Weight gain
  • Infertility
  • Aggravated acne
  • Increased hair growth in a male pattern

High levels of insulin can result in symptoms such as high androgen levels, infertility and lack of ovulation. These symptoms are usually noticed when women are in their 20s or 30s. Diagnosis of PCOS is after a physical examination and laboratory tests. Thyroid and prolactin levels in the blood are tested. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) are tested for higher than normal levels. Tumors in the ovary or adrenal glands can be diagnosed with vaginal and abdominal ultrasounds. Insulin resistance is vital in the diagnosis of PCOS. Insulin is instrumental in regulating the ovarian function. An ovarian biopsy may also be done.


Treatment for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Treatment for women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome depends on what stage of a woman's life this condition has manifested and her fertility desires. Birth control pills are prescribed to regularize the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of uterine cancer. Other medications used in the treatment of PCOS are flutamide and spironolactone.

Clomiphene induces the pituitary gland to secrete more FSH and this stimulates release and maturity of ova. Insulin resistance is reduced with drugs such as Metformin (Glucophage) and Troglitazone. 'Ovarian drilling' is a process of using laser to place small holes in the ovaries so as to normalize the hormonal environment and allow normal ovulation.

Here is how it works

Enter your health or medical queries in our Artificial Intelligence powered Application here. Our Natural Language Navigational engine knows that words form only the outer superficial layer. The real meaning of the words are deduced from the collection of words, their proximity to each other and the context.

Check all your health queries

Diseases, Symptoms, Tests and Treatment arranged in alphabetical order:

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z

Popular Topics
Free Health App
Free Android Health App Free WebApp for iPhones


Bibliography / Reference

Collection of Pages - Last revised Date: November 11, 2019