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MCV blood test

MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume) blood test measures the size of RBC. It is a measure of the average volume of a red blood cell by dividing the hematocrit by the RBC. Any change in the size of RBC indicates certain disorders. This test is often conducted along with RDW blood test. With MCV blood test, RBCs can be categorized into normal, small or large sizes. Larger cells are usually indicative of macrocytic anemia. On the other hand, those with small cells may suffer microcytic anemia. Larger RBCs may indicate liver disease, hypothyroidism, folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency or marrow aplasia. Decreased size of red blood cells is usually noticed in persons suffering from anemia, thalassemia, lead poisoning or chronic renal failure.


MCV Blood test range

MCV blood test is done using electrical impedance or light deflection. The MCV values are considered as significant and reliable in the clinical correlation of a disease. The standard reference value for MCV is 80-100 femolitres. The reference range varies from person to person depending on the age group. In children the reference range for MCV is given in three categories:

For Newborns (95 to 121 fl)
For Infants and Toddlers (76- 86 fl)
For Teenagers (boys: 78- 98 fl and girls 78-102fl)
For Adults 98fl

The MCV in association with underlying anemic conditions is determined by the following mathematical formulae: MCV = 10 X (packed cell volume / RBC count)


Mentzer index

Mentzer index is mathematically expressed as MCV / RBC count. The Mentzer index value determines conditions such as thalassemia when the ratio is less than 13 and it indicates iron deficiency anemia when the ratio is greater than 13.

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Collection of Pages - Last revised Date: October 17, 2017